Great White North

Posted by Ben Evert | 6:59 AM | , | 2 comments »



7th in the Series



"Before the microbrew revolution took hold, Canadian lagers like Moosehead and Molson were considered "the good stuff." Possesing a more interesting hop profile than the lagers produced by their neighbors south of the border, Canadian-style lagers are crisp, refreshing, and very drinkable".


6 pounds Canadian 2 row malt

1/2 pound flaked barley

1 1/2 ounces Pride of Ringwood hops for bittering

1 ounce Kent Golding hops for flavor

1 package American lager yeast

3/4 cup corn sugar for priming



Mash crushed grains for 60 to 90 minutes.

Collect 6 gallons of wort.

Add Pride of Ringwood hops and boil for 1 hour, adding Kent Golding hops for the last 30 minutes.

Cool wort and pitch yeast.

Primary ferment for at 50 to 55 degrees for 5 to 7 days.

Transfer to secondary fermenter. Lager for 2 to 3 weeks.

Bottle using corn sugar. Age in bottle 10 to 14 days.



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Golden Pils

Posted by Ben Evert | 6:11 AM | , | 0 comments »


6th in the series




"The addition of brown sugar to the pilsner style produces a beer that is less dry than the classic pilsner. Light brown sugar is recommended to maintain the correct color for the pilsner style."

8 pounds Alexander's pale malt

1/2 pounds crystal malt (20L)

1 pound light or dark brown sugar

1 ounce Hallertauer hops for bittering

1 ounce Tettnanger hops for flavoring

1 1/2 ounces Saaz hops for aroma

1 teaspoon Irish moss

1 package Pilsen lager yeast

3/4 cup corn sugar



Place the crushed crystal malt in water and steep at 155 degrees for 30 minutes.

Remove spent grains, add malt extract and brown sugar, and bring to a boil.

Add Hallertauer hops and boil for 1 hour.

Add Tettnanger hops 30 minutes into boil.

Add Saaz hops and Irish moss for the last 10 minutes of the boil.

Cool wort and pitch yeast.

Primary ferment at 50 to 55 degrees for 5 to 7 days.

Transfer to secondary fermenter. Lager for 3 to 4 weeks.

Bottle using corn sugar. Age in bottle 10 to 14 days.





Basic Pilsner

Posted by Ben Evert | 6:53 AM | , | 0 comments »






This is the most straightforward of lagers, the German Pils. Agressively hopped with German noble hops (Spalt and Saaz). It is light and dry and refreshing. It is the most popular style of beer consumed in Germany.

6 2/3 pounds light malt extract

2 1/2 ounces Spalt hops for bittering

1 ounce Saaz hops for aroma

1 teaspoon Irish moss

1 package Munich lager yeast

3/4 cup corn sugar for priming


Bring water to boil and add malt extract and Spalt hops.

Boil for 1 hour adding the Saaz hops and Irish moss for the last 10 minutes.

Cool wort and pitch yeast.

Primary ferment at 50 to 55 degrees for 5 to 7 days.

Transfer to secondary fermenter. Lager for 3 to 4 weeks.

Bottle using corn sugar. Age in bottle for 7 to 10 days.



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Basic Stout

Posted by Ben Evert | 8:16 PM | , | 1 comments »





This is the fourth in a series of recipes taken from The Homebrewer's Recipe Guide.

"Dry stout is one of the most popular styles of beer (thank you Mr. Guinness.) It is also one of the most rewarding homebrews. A bottle of this thick, rich brew is a wonderful sight in your refrigerator on a cold winter evening"

Ingredients

6 2/3 pounds dark malt extract

1 pound crystal malt (40L)

1 pound roasted barley

1/2 pound chocolate malt

1/2 malto-dextrin powder

1 1/2 ounces Bullion hops (bittering)

1 ounce Irish ale yeast

1 1/4 cup dry malt extract for priming


Procedure

Place crushed crystal malt, roasted barley and chocolate malt in water and steep at 155 degrees for 30 minutes.

Remove spent grains and add malt extract, malto-dextrin and Bullion hops.

Boil for 1 hour.

Cool wort and pitch yeast.

Ferment for 10 to 14 days.

Bottle using dry malt extract.

Age for 7 to 10 days